• KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems
    Monthly Online Journal (eISSN: 1976-7277)

EP-MAC: Early Preamble MAC To Achieve Low Delay And Energy Consumption In Duty Cycle Based Asynchronous Wireless Sensor Networks

Vol. 6, No.11, November 30, 2012
10.3837/tiis.2012.11.013, Download Paper (Free):

Abstract

Since wireless sensor networks are broadly used in various areas, there have been a number of protocols developed to satisfy specific constraints of each application. The most important and common requirements regardless of application types are to provide a long network lifetime and small end-to-end delay. In this paper, we propose Early Preamble MAC (EP-MAC) with improved energy conservation and low latency. It is based on CMAC but adopts a new preamble type called ‘early preamble’. In EP-MAC, a transmitting node can find quickly when a next receiving node wakes up, so EP-MAC enables direct data forwarding in the next phase. From numerical analysis, we show that EP-MAC improves energy consumption and latency greatly compared to CMAC. We also implemented EP-MAC with NS-2, and through extensive simulation, we confirmed that EP-MAC outperforms CMAC.


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Cite this article

[IEEE Style]
Jeong-Yeob Oak, Young-June Choi and Wooguil Pak, "EP-MAC: Early Preamble MAC To Achieve Low Delay And Energy Consumption In Duty Cycle Based Asynchronous Wireless Sensor Networks," KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems, vol. 6, no. 11, pp. 2980-2991, 2012. DOI: 10.3837/tiis.2012.11.013

[ACM Style]
Oak, J., Choi, Y., and Pak, W. 2012. EP-MAC: Early Preamble MAC To Achieve Low Delay And Energy Consumption In Duty Cycle Based Asynchronous Wireless Sensor Networks. KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems, 6, 11, (2012), 2980-2991. DOI: 10.3837/tiis.2012.11.013